The Tagues


1. Orloj

2. Posters
3. A Fountain with Turtles
4. A Palace Guard
5. Bone Bell
6. A self-poured beer
7. The Národní Divadlo
8. The John Lennon Wall
9. An animal
10. A person playing chess
11. A prostitute in Wenceslas Square
12. One of the toys in the Toy Museum
13. A Hassidic Jew
14. A walkie-talkie
15. A bored dude at the Museum of Czech Cubism
16. Cool street sticker
17. A Horse Drawn Carriage
18. A modern art piece
19. A train at a station platform
20. The front door of the Baroque Riding School
21. The AC Sparta Praha Stadion
22. A local girl’s ear, and or hair
23. The Alphonse Mucha Museum
24. Salvador Dali, at the Wax Museum
25. Jan Hus Monument
26. Franz Kafka’s house on Golden Lane
27. A National Treasure inside Karlstejn Castle
28. Statue of the Holy Infant Jesus
29. Tague a Tag
30. An outstanding door
31. A guy scratching his arse
32. A tree branch at the Old Jewish Cemetery
33. The third level of the Karlovy Lazne Dance Club
34. A real olde Gypsy woman
35. Golden dog on the Charles Bridge
36. The horse statue in front of the National Museum
37. A bottle of Becherovka
38. A toilet seat
39. The Nationale-Nederlanden
40. A chastity belt from the Museum of Torture
41. Any mineral found in the Magic Garnet Museum
42. An old Czech man’s big toe
43. A Gourmet Cupcake
44. Storm Type Foundry
45. Someone hassling you in costume
46. The piano Mozart played while visiting Prague
47. Someone sitting alone at the Cafe Imperial
48. A shot of REAL absinthe
49. A typography book
50. A green glass perfume bottle

1. The Orloj (or Astronomical Clock): {Kim Evans} East St. Kilda, AUS

The first tague was requested by my best friend Kim. Her original request was to tag the “top of the Orloj clock” but once I got there, I realized it was physically impossible. The best I could do was to go up inside the clock tower itself (which I highly recommend for the amazing views of the city) and once every hour, the long hand would sail past a little window inside. The only trouble was, the window was nailed shut and was very grubby. I took a photograph from inside the tower, but it was so disappointingly ugly, and the front of the clock so beautiful, that I made an executive decision to hold the tag up from a distance and capture the front instead.

During my visit to Prague, I often walked past the Orloj on my way through Old Town Square and it never ceased to take my breath away.

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2. One of my “Freedom of Expression” Prague posters: {Jenna Read} Gold Coast. AUS

The second tague request was made by one of the honours students who came with us to Prague. She requested that I tag one of her “Freedom of Expression” posters.

During our visit to Prague, Jenna added typography to  posters she had pre-screenprinted, including found type and hand-cut letters. “Svoboda” is Czech for “freedom” and Tisku” means “press”.

The posters were made in response to the 1989 Velvet Revolution, where posters helped bring about the fall of communism in Prague. Jenna stuck various poster designs around the city, in designated poster areas, and invited people to add their own comments and messages. So I did.

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3. A Fountain with Turtles: {Sharon Searle} Currumbin, AUS

The third tague request was for a fountain with turtles, but Sharon said any animal would do if I couldn’t find turtles in particular, which was lucky, because I couldn’t. I spotted a pet shop and briefly toyed with the idea of buying a real turtle to put in a fountain, but then I would be left with an orphaned turtle and wasn’t sure how Australian customs would feel about it.

In the end, I spotted this fountain in the middle of an overgrown park and thought the sneaky bears shuffling round the pillar were so amazing, that I couldn’t resist.

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4. A Palace Guard: {Richard Blundell} Daisy Hill, AUS

The fourth tague request was for a palace guard and I have to admit, this was the one that scared me the most, before I started. On our first day in Prague, we all trouped up to the castle and took the obligatory tourist photos next to them, and several people told me that if you touched them, you would get arrested. I had certainly seen evidence of a London household guard get very cranky with a Japanese tourist who got too friendly during the photo shoot, so I wasn’t prepared to push it.

I decided the stealth approach was best, so I put double-sided sticky tape on the back of the tag, stood next to the guard while my husband took a “tourist photo” and quietly slapped it on his guard box. I love how the tag stuck perfectly in line with the stripes on the box. I couldn’t have done it better if I tried. I went back a few days later and the tag wasn’t there, so I hope he didn’t get in trouble for allowing his little hut to be tagged.

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5. Bone Bell, Sedlec Ossuary, All Saint’s Chapel: {Shannon Haylee} Reedy Creek, AUS

The fifth tague request was for something, that while not technically located in Prague, is an obligatory part of any visit to the Czech Republic: the Sedlec Ossuary. In 1870, a wood carver was commissioned to decorate the disappointingly small Gothic church with the bones of 40,000 exhumed human skeletons. There are four very large mounds of bones that are sometimes described as “bell shaped”, though they looked much more “pile shaped” when you see them in the flesh (so to speak). The towers, chandelier, coat of arms and garlands of bones were all much more visually interesting, and also not in alarmed wire cages like the bone heaps, and so I tagged the closest, friendliest looking skull in the church instead. We visited the church not long after Michael Jackson’s death, and so the most enjoyable memory from this tag was several people giving an impromptu re-enactment of the Thriller dance under the chandelier.

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6. A self-poured beer from your very own tap at the Beer Factory: {Kellie Leader} Southport, AUS

The sixth tague request was made by another one of the students who accompanied us to Prague. The beer factory is essentially a pub, or nightclub, that encourages competitive binge drinking. On long wooden tables, complete with bench seating, are your very own beer taps. Large groups of people occupy the tables and a live tally of each table’s beer consumption appears on a large video screen.

If you’ve never worked in a pub, pouring beer from a tap requires unexpected skill and most of the students who accompanied me on this excursion started out with giant heads of froth and got progressively better, and drunker as the night wore on. I’m not a beer drinker, so after pouring, and tagging my beer, I gave it to my husband and ordered cocktails from the bar instead. A fun night was had by all.

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7. The Národní Divadlo (or the National Theatre): {Renee Sankey} Gold Coast, AUS

The seventh tague request, the Národní divadlo, is Prague’s national theatre. At each end of the front facade is a notice board advertising upcoming performances, and the keyhole is the mouth of a little sculpted face. It tickled me to think that someone with a very old key, would come and stick the key in her mouth every week and change the posters, so I tagged her.

Just as I was about tie on a tag, a little old security guard came and gave me very strange looks, so I scooted to the other end of the building, where luckily there was a matching notice board. I would love my front door to have a keyhole like this.

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8. The John Lennon Wall: {Nathan Murray} Shailer Park, AUS

The eighth tague request was one I was quite excited about before I arrived in Prague. I had seen the John Lennon wall in photographs, but knew little of its history.

When John Lennon was shot and killed in 1980, young Czechs graffitied a long stretch of garden wall in homage, and it subsequently became more symbolic of Czech youth and their quest for peace, in an era of communist rule. Since then, the wall has become a legal graffiti wall with paintings, scribble and ongoing discussions of peace.

The original drawing of John Lennon was beautiful, but alas it is no longer there, so I tagged a more recent painting of him instead. It is a very peaceful place and I enjoyed watching people spending time reading all the messages. It is definitely my favourite popular culture shrine and I’m sure John himself would love it.

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9. An animal—dog, cat, bird—humans excluded: {David Lydiard} Tugun, AUS

Tague request number nine drove me crazy, because I kept looking at every single dog and cat that we saw, wondering A: Could I catch it? B: How do I ask the owner without appearing to be a random crazy person in the park? C: Do I even want a cat or dog, or is that too predictable? As luck would have it, while on a group excursion to the television tower, we lost the lead half of our group, and stumbled upon two very lovely girls in a park, who were taking their bunny rabbits for a walk!

They spoke English very well and didn’t seem at all disturbed by eight excited Australians descending upon them with cameras, and agreed to my strange request. As the blue-eyed bunny grazed the long lush grass, I tied a tag to him and tried to ignore the racket as my students fired off hundreds of photographs to document the fact! The resulting tague is one of my favourites. I was very glad we got lost that day.

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10. A person playing chess with the tag “czech mate”: {Mariko Walton} Los Angeles, USA

Tague request number ten required an extra tag, one with the words “Czech mate”. I had bought a chess set in Greece as a present for someone back home, and so I assumed I would use that if I couldn’t find anyone playing in the streets. I discovered, however, there was a large tiled chess board in a park by the river, with wooden chess pieces one metre high. Perfect.

I took my husband with me, because I am not a chess player and wasn’t quite sure what position the pieces had to be in, in order to constitute a “check mate”. He arranged them all for me, which was lucky, because one metre high chess pieces are surprisingly heavy. I originally thought this park game was for children, but I didn’t see how they could move the pieces. As if on cue, when I was all set to take the photograph, two little brats appeared, attempted to move several pieces, failed, knocked over some much lighter pawns, then ran off laughing!

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11. A prostitute in Wenceslas Square: {Wayne Shelley} Gold Coast, AUS

Tague request number eleven was a request I was quite nervous about, but as our visit wore on, the frustration at the lack of prostitutes, overtook the fear of approaching one. Several times we went to Wenceslas Square after dark, and hung around hoping to see a lady of the night, but with no luck.

On the last day of our trip, I decided to try Wenceslas Square during the day, as we had a few hours to kill, and no sooner had we arrived than “bingo”. The longest legs, the shortest skirt and the highest heels I had ever seen. I decided I couldn’t risk a refusal at this late stage, so I had to use my now famous “stealth bombing” method before she disappeared into the crowd. Double-sided tape on the tag, an “oops sorry” bump and the tague was done. Phew!

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12. One of the toys in the Toy Museum. Perhaps the beautiful China Doll Bust or the Deep Sea Divers: {Franca Barnabas} Melbourne, AUS

Tague request number twelve actually took place inside a stairwell. I climbed the many stairs round and round to the toy museum and walked past a display that had a beautiful china doll behind glass, but once I looked inside the museum, I realised all the toys were behind glass and I couldn’t find any other dolls, so I opted for the one in the stairwell.

I received a lot of strange looks as I lay on my stomach to take the photograph. It was very difficult to get a clear shot, because it was so cramped and dark, but I was determined to get Darth Vader in the picture, even just a little bit.

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13. A Hassidic Jew worshipping at the Klaus Synagogue: {Vince McKillop} Mount Tambourine, AUS

If I were superstitious, I would believe that tague request number thirteen was indeed unlucky. It was the hardest of the lot, and I would consider it the only fail. The first man that I approached spoke very good English and when I explained my project, he virtually ran from the synagogue and off down the street. The second two men didn’t run, but walked off as briskly as the old man’s legs would allow, though I was able to take a photograph of the back of them disappearing down the street.

After two more failed attempts, I gave up. I was obviously distressing people with my request, and I didn’t want to upset any more people who were perhaps already on a pilgrimage that was upsetting enough. In contrast, we found some very happy looking Jewish marionettes and so I decided to tag them instead.

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14. A walkie-talkie in the hand of a radio amateur outside the National Society for Ham Radio: {Tony Falla} Castlemaine, AUS

Tague request number fourteen was made by my father, and required me to travel far into the deep dark suburbs of Prague. I wasn’t confident I could find my way to the Cesky Radioklub, and so left it until the end of our trip.

I made an appointment with the National Radio Society president, and two train trips and a long walk later, found myself at a block of offices in the ‘burbs. Josef was amazed I had made it there by myself, without a taxi or a guide, and was very hospitable. In broken English, over a couple of large beers, he eventually understood what it was I wanted him to do. “Walkie-talkie” is obviously not universal slang, because he produced several different bits of equipment out of boxes, before hitting the jackpot.

He also gave me several “radio amateur” gifts to take home for my father, and told me to thank my father for “sending him such a fantastic woman”. Hilarious! In the end, this tague was one of the most enjoyable because he was so excited by the project and was so pleased to be a part of it.

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15. The most uninspired, bored dude being dragged around the Museum of Czech Cubism. Bonus points if he doesn’t notice: {Michael Quinn} Eagleby, AUS

Tague request number fifteen was one of the most time consuming, because I went back to the museum on three separate occasions, only to find the place devoid of any men whatsoever. Even the security guards were women, and I needed to tag a male.

Success came when I popped in on the way back from an excursion with an American art and journalism student from the University of Miami. He was very tired from the excursion, and certainly quite bored of the art. The only thing he was interested in was a Tex Mex meal that we devoured shortly afterwards.

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16. The coolest, or most impressive street stickers/sprays/stencil art you can find: {Miles Rumsey} Falmouth, UK

Tague request number sixteen was a lot of fun because I was with a group of students when we discovered it, and there was much hilarity, posing with the naked figures, adding our own graffiti and taking close up photographs of genitalia.

I didn’t make a habit of leaving the tags in place once I had taken the shot, but in this case I did, and I was told by several students who kept stopping by, that my tag was still there weeks later—a little crumpled and well-rained on, but still there nonetheless.

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17. A Horse Drawn Carriage: {Richard Neville} Ormeau, AUS

Tague request number seventeen was one of the first tagues I did, simply because old town square is one of the first places everyone visits when in Prague, and that’s where the horse and carriages hang out, waiting for customers.

I picked the carriage that I liked best, took a couple of shots, then went and stuck the tag to the edge of the wheel, and took another shot. Just as I was getting ready to take the actual “tague” shots, all of the carriages drove off at once. Maybe it was some sort of shift change or maybe the police were coming, I have no idea, but off they all went, with my tag sticky taped to the wheel. I often think about it spinning round and around, all over Prague. I wonder how far it got before it fell off in the street. I followed the carriage for a while, but it was much faster than I was.

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18. A modern art piece at the corner of Havirska and Na Prikope: {Martijn Savenije} Amsterdam, NL

Tague request number eighteen was for a modern art piece, so I assumed there would be lots to choose from. When I got to the specified corner, I couldn’t actually see any, but there was a charity organisation set up with an information table and lots of blank flat bricks.

The idea was to donate some money, which bought you a brick, which you could then decorate with the paints they had, and add it to a wall that they were building.

All the money raised was to help build houses in Myanmar and Indonesia. Once your brick was decorated, you added it to the pile, and the resulting piece was indeed a sculptural work of art, so I tagged it. It is a really nice idea.

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19. A train at a station platform with the station’s name included: {Michelle Robie} Castlemaine, AUS

Tague request number nineteen was quite easy as we caught the train interstate several times from the hlavní nádraží—Prague’s national station.

The first time we went to the station, we caught a train to Karlštejn Castle, but there were too many people as we got on, so I waited until we got back to Prague and then tagged the train after everyone got off.

There were plenty of stations I could have tagged along the way, but Praha itself made the most sense, and the train waited there the longest, which gave me time to play with different compositions. Graphically I really like this tague. The red and blue is quite striking.

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20. The front door of the Baroque Riding School, Prague Castle: {Sally Wilde} Brisbane, AUS

Tague request number twenty was made by my mother. She thought she requested something easy, but the only problem is, she picked something that was no longer there. The riding school itself closed down in the mid-twentieth century. I had seen old photographs of it, and had some idea of what the doors looked like, coupled with the fact that the street itself is quite short, so I figured it wouldn’t be too difficult to find.

I asked two very helpful, off-duty Palace guards, who pointed up the street, and said it was possible that their parade ground could have been used for horses, and that their offices might have once been stables. Once I got to where they had pointed, the doors looked very familiar, and I knew I had found it.

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21.The AC Sparta Praha Stadion: {George Karakatsanis} Byron Bay, AUS

Tague request number twenty-one was made by my soccer mad husband, and luckily he came with me, otherwise I may well have given up on this one. We tried several times to catch a tram to the stadium, but they would turn off unexpectedly, and so we would get off, try again, and the same thing would happen. In frustration, we decided to just walk the four or five kilometres instead. As we got closer, we realised why all the trams were turning off and avoiding the area—the entire road system leading up to it was being dug up and completely remodeled! No wonder. We had to negotiate barriers, piles of rubble and holes in the ground to get there and I certainly wouldn’t have done so if I was on my own.

By the time we got home, I was exhausted, but I love the fish eye shot and the colours are so vibrant that it was worth it.

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22. A local girl’s ear, and or hair: {Bianca Frankie} Brisbane, AUS

Tague request number twenty-two struck me as a really interesting one and I was pleased when our translator Milus turned out to be a local Prague girl.

Milus (pronounced mee-loosh) always came with us on group excursions, whenever we needed to buy bus or train tickets. The system is quite complicated, depending on which class you want, if you need allocated seating (not that it made much difference most of the time) and ensuring you get discounts for group tickets.

I tagged Milus when we were waiting for the bus to the Terezen concentration camp, and so we were standing in the station surrounded by students, but by now, they had seen me tag enough things that they no longer needed to photograph the event.

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23. The Alphonse Mucha Museum: {George Manicaros} Hill End, AUS

Tague request number twenty-three was the first tague I did when I arrived in Prague.

Alphonse Mucha has been one of my favourite artists, since I discovered him while at university, so I was very excited to discover that there was a museum of his posters in Prague.

Two students and I went to the museum, and I have to say it was a highlight of the trip. His work was even more exquisite in the flesh, and much larger than I had ever imagined. Even if you read in a book that a picture is two metres high, you don’t really get the  full impact until you stand in front of it. Stunning.

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24. Salvador Dali, at the Wax Museum (or as close to him as can be gotten): {Em Davidson} Kingston, Ont. CAN

Tague request number twenty-four made me laugh. I have been to a couple of wax museums, so I knew to expect a shabby dusty display, but I didn’t expect two of the Kransky Sisters to be working the front desk as well. Everywhere you looked were video cameras and signs saying “we are watching, don’t touch the waxworks”, so when I found Dali, I behaved myself and stuck the tag to the wall for fear of the Kranskys. The only trouble was, it made for a crappy photo, so after a while, I got braver and stuck the tag to his sleeve. I made sure I didn’t touch the wax, took my shots, removed the tag and looked around the rest of the museum. It was filled with Czech sports people and politicians, and amusingly, Adolf Hitler, screaming a glass cage!

When I left, the Kransky’s were waiting. They followed me with matching death stares, and made it quite clear they disapproved of the strange behavior they had witnessed on their matching little television screens. I only barely managed to stifle my laughter as I burst out into the street. Hilarious.

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25. Jan Hus Monument: {Albert Pak} Chicago IL, USA

Tague request number twenty-five was a monument to fifteenth century religious reformer Jan Hus, located in the middle of old town square, just around the corner from the Orloj clock.

I love how these austere monuments are guaranteed to be covered in bird shit and I snapped a shot of one of the culprits in action. I did want to tag the monument itself, but there is a chain around it and very clear signs about how the statue itself shouldn’t be touched. Normally that wouldn’t stop me, but it just so happened that in the square was a military display of all the different regiments that the Czech Republic had on offer. Call me chicken, but being surrounded by coach loads of soldiers did not fill me with the necessary confidence needed to break the law in front of them, so I tagged the chain instead.

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26. Franz Kafka’s house on Golden Lane: {Heather Faulkner} Brisbane, AUS

Tague request number twenty-six was made by one of the lecturers who organised our trip. Everywhere you go in Prague, you see evidence of Franz Kafka. He appears to be much more appreciated after his death, but when he was alive, he lived in this cute little blue house up by the castle. Golden Lane itself is now fenced off as a tourist attraction, and the house is a shop selling trinkets and souvenirs. I wonder how Franz would feel about that.

I stuck Heather’s tag to the sign on the front of the house and then had to wait literally twenty minutes for the hoards of tourists to clear long enough to get a clean shot. The funny part was, while I waited, several hundred people must have taken a photo of the sign, and not one stopped to examine the little yellow paper tag stuck to it. It made me chuckle to think of those 200 people getting home and taking a closer look at their photos and thinking “what the?” I left this cute boy in one of the shots because he appeared to be on a tagging mission of his own and would slap things with his hand as if to say “I got ya”. Cute.

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27. A National Treasure inside Karlstejn Castle: {Cynthia Houtzager} Southport, AUS

Tague request number twenty-seven was a fun one. Karlštejn Castle is an hour away from Prague, and was built as King Charles’ summer palace. It was also built as a fortress for the crown jewels, which is lucky, because twice it was attacked, and twice the jewels were protected. The castle is now set up as a “living” museum, with all of the furniture and paintings in position to show how it was 650 years ago.

As the tour began, I started to get a little worried. The tour guide was very strict about not taking photographs, and as we were herded from room to room, I began to think this was going to be much harder than I thought, coupled with the fact there were signs everywhere saying that the video cameras were hooked up to the local police surveillance. Yikes.

I didn’t quite know what national treasure Cynthia had in mind, but when we got to King Charles’ bedchamber and the guide pointed to the desk that Charles would sit and write at, I knew this was my chance. I tossed the tag over the guard rope and it landed on the corner of the table. I shot the photographs from my hip and then snatched the tag back (without touching the desk) as we were herded out of the room. Success!

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28. Statue of the Holy Infant Jesus, in the Church of Our Lady Victorious: {Penny Eldridge} Nerang, AUS

Tague request number twenty-eight proved quite time consuming. Our hotel was quite near the church luckily, because they had mass five times a day in five different languages, which meant every time I visited, there were hundreds of people in front of the infant Jesus.

When I finally did make it into the empty church to take the photograph, there was a nun fussing around in front of him, dusting the surfaces and changing the flowers, which meant jumping the rope was impossible. The infant Jesus is also in a glass cabinet, and quite high up anyway, so I had to use a similar method to the Orloj and simply hold the tague up in front.

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29. Tague a Tag: {Matt Hearne} Wongawallan, AUS

Tague request number twenty-nine actually proved more difficult than I thought it would. I wasn’t able to find good quality graffiti tags, and most of the ones we saw were the black spray can, quick scribble types, and I wanted one that used lots of colours and had been well thought out and planned.

Eventually I found this tag on a wall near the river Vlatava, and luckily it is quite beautiful. I also like the way the wall looks suitably distressed and crumbly. It is a very “Prague” wall.

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30. An OUTSTANDING door. Either beautiful or crappy: {Anke Moller} Oxenford, AUS

Tague request number thirty was difficult in totally the opposite way that number twenty-nine was. Every door in Prague is so amazing, how could I possibly choose one?

Most doors in Prague, are carved wood with metal embellishments, but once I visited the gothic St. Vitus cathedral in the Palace, I knew this had to be one of the most amazing doors I had ever seen. Its bronze doors are decorated with three-dimensional sculpted reliefs, with scenes from the history of the cathedral and from legends of St. Wenceslas and St. Adalbert.

The full name of the cathedral is “St. Vitus, St. Wenceslas and St. Adalbert Cathedral”, but everyone calls it St. Vitus. The cathedral is located within the Prague Castle grounds and contains the tombs of many Bohemian kings. It is quite breathtaking, and that’s before you even look at the stained glass windows inside.

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31. The hairiest fattest guy you can find scratching his arse: {Sharee Vitale} Tallai, AUS

Tague request number thirty-one had me stumped for a while. Czechs aren’t particularly fat or hairy, but while on a train, I was able to persuade an American man with a wonderfully ample bottom to “scratch his ass” when he stood up to get something out of his backpack.

We passed through Kolín station as he was doing so, which I found strangely satisfying. He wasn’t as fat or as hairy as I would have liked, but it was the best I could do, and at least he understood me, where several Czech men didn’t!

It was quite a relief to get this one out of the way.

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32. A tree branch at the Old Jewish Cemetery: {Amy Lehr Miller} Dallastown, PA. USA

Tague request number thirty-two was one that I was initially quite excited about, but the reality of the situation left me feeling very strange. Firstly, you could only take photographs in the cemetery if you paid extra, which I did, but it left everyone looking around suspiciously at anyone with a camera. Secondly, a security guard walked around and around briskly, eyeing off everyone in a very unpleasant way as if we were about to deface the graves or steal something.

The third event that wound me right up, was a nosey busy-body of an English tourist who started snooping on what I was doing, peered closely at the tag as I was photographing it, and began plucking at the knot with her fingernails. I must have given her a look that said “if you don’t stop what you’re doing right now, I’m going to punch you in the face” because she stopped untying the tag, and started flapping on about knowing an American who donated this tree. The tree looked about 150 years old, and that was therefore impossible. When I pointed this out to her, she apologised and offered to hold the tag still for me while I photographed it! Bonkers.

Against considerable odds, I got the photograph to convey this as a calm and peaceful place, which is how I think a cemetery should be, even though the people there that day were quite neurotic.

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33. Anything on the third level of the Karlovy Lazne Dance Club (it has FIVE levels of nightclubbing!!): {Katie Hilton} Miami, AUS

Tague request number thirty-three required the assistance of several of my students, as there way no way I was going to the five level dance club by myself. We arrived early and explored the place. Each floor was themed quite differently, and played very different music to the other floors, so essentially there were five different nightclubs in one building.

The third floor was playing 80s disco and had a “Saturday Night Fever” style dance floor, with flashing squares of red, blue and green. I decided to tag the dance floor itself, as it is such a major part of the third floor club. The feet you see in the photograph are four of the students, and mine. A fun night was had by all.

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34. A real olde Gypsy woman: {Carlina Merritt} Pimpama, AUS

Tague request number thirty-four proved almost as difficult as number thirteen. I didn’t actually find a real “olde” gypsy woman the whole time we were in Prague, or a real young one for that matter. We saw plenty on Rhodes, which is where this main photograph was taken, but even after visiting a gypsy bar in Ceský Krumlov, I still only found gypsy men and children.

There was an area I was told about in Prague where a lot of gypsy’s would be found, but the locals told me that to just go in there by myself, and approach them might be quite dangerous and I should go with someone who knows their culture. I ran out of time to organise anything like that and I was too scared to go by myself.

In the end, because of my black hair and nomadic heritage, some of the students who were with us, nicknamed me “gypsy” while we were in Prague, so the only answer was to tag myself.

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35. Golden dog on the Charles Bridge: {Aleksandra Petrova} Riga, Latvia

Tague request thirty-five was for possibly the most photographed object in Prague. The reason it is “gold” is because everyone who sees it, touches it for “good luck”, thereby keeping it perpetually polished. Quite a few of the soot covered bronze sculptures on the Charles Bridge have areas that are polished clean by the repeated rubbing of hopeful tourists. I gave the dog a few pats myself on the way past, as we crossed the Charles Bridge most days that we were there.

The Charles Bridge is a pedestrian-only bridge, which means it often fills up with tourists enjoying the busking and the weird and wonderful sights. As a result, my main challenge was to get some alone time with the dog in daylight. Not an easy task, but with the help of my husband, we kept the hounds at bay long enough to get the shots. Good doggy. I am sure a lot of people there that day, are convinced my name is Aleksandra Petrova now.

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36. The horse statue in front of the National Museum: {Andy Wang} Taipei

Tague request number thirty-six is actually the Wenceslas monument in front of the National Museum, located at the top of Wenceslas Square. The square itself used to be known as the horse market, so of all the things to tag in Wenceslas Square, the man himself on a horse seems quite appropriate.

The statue is in a fairly pivotal location, in terms of Prague history. In 1918, the proclamation of Czechoslovakian independence was read in front of it. In 1945, the Nazis paraded past it. In 1969, Jan Palach set himself on fire, (in protest of the Soviet invasion), near by, and in 1989, the velvet revolution demonstrations were held all round it, so this statue has seen a lot of action, one way or another.

As I tagged it, I looked around at the plethora of strip bars and fast food restaurants and wondered what other sights this statue has yet to see from his view on the hill.

36_horse

37. A bottle of Becherovka 38% alcohol…favourite drink of Czech people: {Mathew Griffin} Boston, MA. USA

Tague request number thirty-seven was for a bottle of the Czech national drink. I bought a bottle, and then looked around for a suitable spot to photograph it. I stumbled across the Franz Kafka cafe, and while the man himself seemed to have been more fond of vodka in his tea than anything else, I’m sure he would have drunk a fair bit of Becherovka in his time. The wood paneling in the cafe made a suitable backdrop and the whole place had the perfect shabby Bohemian feel—even if I did get eyed suspiciously by the waiter several times!

When it came time to drink it, I tried it as a shot, and then with some lemonade, but nothing I did to it could take away the sensation of drinking rubbing alcohol with essence of cloves. With apologies to the Czech people, I found it to be disgusting. My students, however thought the free alcohol was wonderful, and downed the whole bottle in an evening!

37_becherovka

38. A toilet seat: {Jay Woods} Burleigh Heads, AUS

Tague request number thirty-eight was a very interesting one for me. Every time I went to a toilet in Prague, I would inspect it for its tague potential, and usually the lack of light would rule it out. I needn’t have worried. The perfect toilet presented itself on a day trip to Terezen, a World War II Jewish concentration camp. Originally built as a fortress in 1780 by Joseph II, it was designed to keep people out. Hitler, on the other hand, used it to keep people in.

Thousands of Jews were imprisoned at Terezen, awaiting execution in German death camps, just over the border. The worst place we encountered during our visit to Terezen was the little fortress. It served as the camp’s prison. Hundreds of people lived on top of each other in these thick walled little rooms, with one toilet between them, and so if this looks disgusting in the photograph, you can imagine how much worse it was when the rooms were occupied by hundreds of  starving, tortured and diseased prisoners. It was a sobering day for all of us.

38_toiletseat

39. The Nationale-Nederlanden (dancing building): {Momoko Cunneen} Tokyo, JAP

Tague request number thirty-nine is one of Prague’s “must see” attractions. It is also known as “Fred and Ginger” (as in, Astaire and Rogers) because it looks like one part of the building has grabbed the other part in a dancing embrace.

Designed by Canadian architect Frank Gehry, and Czech Vlado Milunić, it is a very playful building and I have a real soft spot for it. I was disappointed with the photographs I took, because the light was so dull on the day we went, combined with the fact it was difficult to get a good angle that showed the tag close up, and also conveyed the best parts of the architecture. Apparently, when it was built in the 90s, president Václav Havel hoped it would become a cultural centre, but instead it became an office block with a French restaurant on the roof. Sad.

39_dancingbuilding

40. A chastity belt from the Museum of Torture Instruments: {Jenn Molloy} Dublin IRE

Tague request number forty was an anticlimax. It was with great excitement that I entered the museum of torture instruments and with great disappointment that I left. I don’t even know what I was expecting really, all the good stuff was there: shackles, chopping blocks, racks and even an iron maiden—maybe torture instruments just aren’t that interesting after all?

The chastity belt was behind glass, and a very strange shape. I can’t imagine anyone walking around in it, let alone wearing it for any period of time! The note beside it claimed that sometimes women put them on voluntarily to avoid being raped while traveling or if soldiers were nearby. An interesting theory, but one I don’t believe, certainly not if this was the “belt” in question. It is in desperate need of redesigning. The heart shape is a nice touch though!

40_chastitybelt

41. Any mineral found within the Magic Garnet Museum: {Justin Spicer} Seattle, WA. USA

Tague request number forty-one involved yet another visit to a museum. I hoped to pay my entry fee, get in and get out quick, do the tague and be gone. The woman in the museum however, had other ideas. Obviously the price of my admission entitled me to a guided tour—whether I wanted it or not. I groaned inwardly as she started telling me in slow, broken English, all about every single display in the museum, but once I had resigned myself to the fact that this was going to be an hour of my life that I would never get back, it was actually a really fascinating tour. There is a lot of cultural meaning for the Czechs behind garnets, and the way they feature throughout European history was really quite interesting.

Luckily when the tour was over, she said I could take photographs and left me to it. The bowl of garnets and other minerals was the only thing that wasn’t behind glass, and so I was able to tag them quite easily in the end.

One other great thing about the tour was that the price of admission also gets you a little souvenir garnet, which made for a lovely keepsake. Very enjoyable.

41_garnet

42. An old Czech man’s big toe: {Marie-Therese Bjornerud} Melbourne, AUS

Tague request number forty-two proved almost as difficult as the man scratching his arse, and at least he didn’t have to be Czech!

I had some business cards printed before I left Australia, that explained about my project in Czech. I tried to give one of these cards to an old man who couldn’t speak much English, and he waved me off as if I was selling something, or handing out free Internet vouchers. I guess the trouble with old men in any culture is bad eyesight. They would rather wave you away than try and read what you are handing them, so in the end, I opted for a middle-aged man who agreed to do it but didn’t want his face shown in the picture. Fair enough. As it turned out, he had the most fantastic “old man” toenails anyway.

42_bigtoe

43. A Gourmet Cupcake! With the Tag… “Ready for Czeching by Katelyn, the Cupcake Connoisseur”: {Katelyn Hankinson} Springwood, AUS

Tague request number forty-three proved impossible. In Australia, you can’t walk down the street without tripping over a cupcake shop. In Prague, they have never heard of them! In every bakery I visited, pastries are the order of the day. I scoured coffee shops, cake shops, and every kind of shop that might have them. I also had several students scouting around as well. Nothing.

What I did find, however, was a mini ice cream cake in a really sweet tearoom, and because it was almost cupcake shaped, I figured it would have to do! I only had a few minutes to get the shot, because once they brought it out on the plate, it started melting in the afternoon heat. I have to say though, it was delicious.

43_cupcake

44. Storm Type Foundry. Or some evidence of it’s existence: {Denica Layton} Gold Coast, AUS

Tague request number forty-four was one of the most disappointing and falls into the “so close, but yet so far” category. Denica is one of my students and she is in the process of designing her own typefaces, and hopes to start a font foundry, so one of the excursions we had planned was to visit world-renowned font designer František Štorm of the Storm Font Foundry.

I managed to make contact with him before we left for Prague, but I couldn’t get hold of him once we arrived. Eventually he emailed back and he agreed for us to come and see him, and said he would pick us up from the train station, as he lived in the country. Terrific. Only trouble is, he could only see us on the last day of or trip and he lived four hours out of Prague. Our plane left in the afternoon and so we decided we couldn’t risk not getting back in time and the visit was cancelled. Such a shame—so I tagged our emails instead.44_storm

45. Someone hassling you to attend a classical music ensemble performance in the Prague Castle area. Bonus points if they’re dressed in period clothing: {Scott Esdaile} Brisbane, AUS

Tague request number forty-five frustrated me a little, as there was no one handing out flyers at the castle, they were all in old town, and not many were in period dress. I was also quite surprised when I started talking to them, that none of them could speak English.

When I spotted this guy on the Charles Bridge, I figured there was a chance he might speak English, and whilst I’m not sure what period he was representing, he was certainly in costume! I asked him if I could take a photograph, and he agreed, though seemed suspicious when I gave him the tag. He said he was from Africa’s Ivory Coast, and perked up considerably when I said I used to have a neighbour from Ghana, so we were getting along nicely until his friend in the sailor suit decided to see what was going on. He snatched the tag from the guy’s hand and inspected it. Luckily I had taken all the shots I needed before Gilligan came along and ruined things—I’m glad I got him in the shot too.

45_costume

46. Anything captivating inside or outside the historic Czech Museum Of Music building, but the closer to the piano Mozart played while visiting Prague, the better: {Erin Dyrud} Missoula, Montana, USA

Tague request number forty-six was quite an adrenalin rush. By this stage of the trip, I had perfected my stealth-bombing technique and would settle for nothing less than the piano itself. The museum was amazing, with lots of rare and precious musical instruments and the place was riddled with CCTV, “no photo” signs and the ubiquitous little old ladies in security guard uniforms. As I meandered through the museum, I soon picked up a guard who followed me around as if she knew I was about to do something illegal, and no matter how long I stood reading plaques, or how quickly I sped from one room to another, I could not shake her.

My opportunity came in the form of another guard sent to relieve her. They both disappeared into a guard station and were distracted out of eye shot for about 45 seconds, but that was long enough. I placed the tag on the guard rail, whipped out my camera, and with great glee, snapped the shots I needed and hightailed it out of there singing the theme song from Mission Impossible.

46_mozart

47. Someone sitting alone at the Cafe Imperial. I want a photo of them including the mosaic ceiling: {Angela Nagel} Research, AUS

Tague request number forty-seven was such a lovely experience. The cafe itself is one of the most stunning rooms I’ve ever seen. High ceilings and thick pillars covered with mosaic tiles, with silver service waiters everywhere and cakes piled high on white tablecloths. My husband and I had an Imperial chocolate, while we waited for someone to appear and sit alone.

We were just about to give up as they took our empty cups away, when in walked Jana. She spoke great English and was very friendly and had come here on her own. I told her about my project and the tague request, and she said she would be only too happy to be in the photo, except “she wasn’t very nice looking”. Oh poor Jana. I told her she was beautiful and she posed just perfectly with the tag and the mosaic ceiling in the background. I think we made her day.

47_imperial

48. A shot of REAL absinthe… which you will then drink: {Katie Garvan} Gold Coast, AUS

Tague request number forty-eight could have taken place anywhere, because absinthe is sold all over Prague, but I decided to go directly to the source and headed for the Absinthe Bar. It was suitably seedy, with pokey little wooden tables and chairs, an American blues guy playing in one corner and a cranky waitress we nicknamed “peesedoffbeetch”. How very Prague!

We chose the “Toulouse Lautrec” absinthe, at a whopping 60% alcohol, and were treated to “peesedoffbeetch” giving us our own fiery display that involved soaking sugar cubes in the absinthe, setting fire to them and melting them into our drinks through a special absinthe spoon. I tagged my shot while my husband drank his, and once I was happy with my photographs, I drank mine. I have to say it was like being shot in the throat, and on an empty stomach, it left me quite drunk for about an hour. We later drank 60% absinthe on several other occasions but it never seemed to have quite the same devastating effect as when prepared by “peesedoffbeetch”.

48_absinthe

49. The most BRILLIANT/BEAUTIFUL/INSPIRING book on typography that you can find: {Ashleigh Brennan} Gold Coast, AUS

Tague request number forty-nine quite literally fell in my lap. We went to visit Filip Blažek, a Czech graphic designer at his studio. He showed us through his poster collection from the 1989 revolution, of which he played an active part, and then he started showing us some book projects he had worked on, and produced a catalogue of typefaces from a type foundry he was helping to promote. I asked where I could buy a copy and he gave me this one for free. Yay.

From a purely aesthetic point of view, I really like this tague, just because the fonts are so lovely and I managed to style quite a nice shot. I brought the catalogue back to Australia and gave it to Ashleigh, who squealed with delight, as she is quite obsessed with typefaces. I think it has gone to a very good home.

49_typebook

50. A green glass perfume bottle from an antique market: {Kate Russell} East St. Kilda, AUS

Tague request number fifty was made in homage to Kate’s mother, who before she died of cancer, made a trip to Prague and brought back a green glass perfume bottle for Kate as a present.

The antique market where she bought it was behind the Klementinum. Now this market only happens on a Sunday, and the first weekend, we went to Ceský Krumlov, so I only had one chance. I found the market easily enough, but there were only about eight or nine stalls. It was quite clearly a genuine antique market, not the usual Sunday trash and treasure that we have in Australia, and there were plenty of ornate blue and red bottles in amongst the spoons and silverware, but no green ones. I was about to give up when I spotted this little beauty. I had envisaged the kind of perfume bottle that stands on a dressing table, not the kind you put in your handbag, but beggars can’t be choosers and it was really quite sweet anyway, so I tagged it and brought it back for Kate as a present.

50_perfume

22 Responses to The Tagues

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ange

July 2nd, 2009 at 11:37 pm

The tags look great! I love the rabbit. Cant wait to see mine. Good luck with it!

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michelle robie

July 5th, 2009 at 1:10 am

Fantastic! Thanks heaps whoever blue tacked the label on the train.

Great shots.

All aboard to the next unknown destination.

Buy a ticket and sup an Absinthe on me.

Cheers

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Dave Lydiard

July 7th, 2009 at 8:03 am

These look awesome Dom! Keep it up!

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ange

July 12th, 2009 at 12:21 am

Wow mosaic heaven ..thanks for cafe imperial!

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Em Davidson

July 12th, 2009 at 6:33 pm

Wow, pretty darn impressive so far. Can’t wait to see more of the awesome tagues!

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Franca

July 12th, 2009 at 11:35 pm

Dominique, these photos are beautiful. What a fabulous snapshot of Prague.

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Martijn Savenije

July 14th, 2009 at 7:44 am

How very nice! Thanks for tagging!

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Kim

July 16th, 2009 at 7:21 am

Fantastic shots Dommie!! However I DO recall our conversation was to climb up, hang out on a limb and tag the actual ‘Orloj’ clock….there’s still time to do it…yeah, do it, do it… I will settle for the little skeleton to the side if you cant reach 🙂 X

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moonsail

July 17th, 2009 at 8:44 pm

Thanks Kimmie. I did climb to the top of the tower and you could see the sun on the top. I even tagged the window and took a photo, but it was so ugly and boring to be up behind the clock rather than in front of it that I made an executive decision to tag the front.

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Amy

July 18th, 2009 at 1:04 am

Bloody fantastic! They all look great! I was excited to see mine. Love it.

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kalavinka

July 20th, 2009 at 2:54 pm

these are amazing. even if it wasn’t for an art project, i say this is the way to go when travelling. makes for much more interesting photos and travel stories.

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Sharon

July 21st, 2009 at 5:21 am

Thanks Dominique….I can’t believe you found a fountain for me with animals on it. Great photos and I’m glad you didn’t get arrested. Love the antique bottle and cupcake shop and some of those buildings are gorgeous. Can’t wait to hear all the stories.

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Scott Esdaile

July 21st, 2009 at 9:12 am

Awesome! Bonus points for the period costume (tague #45) and special secret bonus points for the sailor next to him! So did you buy any concert tickets of the serf dude?!

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Em Davidson

July 23rd, 2009 at 1:43 am

Yay, there is Mr. Dali! Way cool, I wasn’t sure if it was going to be possible for him to be directly tagued. Wicked that is was! ;]

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moonsail

July 23rd, 2009 at 2:36 am

Thanks everyone. I’m home now so will be working on an updated version of the site that has all the backstories, (and believe me, every tague had a story!!) so I’ll let you know when that is up, as well as geotagging every tague. My laptop died while overseas so a lot of the project has had to wait until I got home, including the rest of the tagues. All 50 were done *kinda* so if yours is not here, stay tuned.

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The tagues are all up | the {Tague} project

September 2nd, 2009 at 12:40 am

[…] The Tagues […]

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Ken

September 6th, 2009 at 5:35 am

The tagues went brilliantly Domi;; I’m even on two. You have made one pseudo asian miami kid’s dream. The photos look superb, I’m jealous since you had a point and shoot and it still came out better than my rebel cam pics.

BOW to the prostitute photo. It’s no Chris, but still brilliant. Miss you!

xo
Ken

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shan

September 7th, 2009 at 8:00 pm

loved the tague, awesome

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Penny

September 8th, 2009 at 1:10 pm

Very impressive Dominique! What a great idea. thank you for my baby Jesus statue, he’s beautiful. it looks like you had a ball and it was great to share it with you!
cheers
Penny

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Alan Harrison

September 18th, 2009 at 11:06 am

Hi Dominique,

Wow, what a cool idea this was!
As you might remember, I’ve been taking groups around the world for over 14 years and I’ve had clients take photographs of all sorts of odd things – I LOVE this!

The closest that I’ve seen to these “tagues” was a Canadian teacher of special needs children.
She bought the class mascot on tour with her and we photographed it every day in front of somewhere famous, then emailed the photo back to the school kids.

My favourite tagues are definitely the fountain, the door and the “working girl” !

-Alan.

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moonsail

September 18th, 2009 at 2:56 pm

Thanks for all your great feedback and encouragement guys. The book is coming really soon. Should be fantastic. I really appreciate everyone’s input!

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michelle robie

October 18th, 2009 at 9:29 pm

Thanks Dom, have worked my way down reading. Fab mx

Comment Form

Tagging Prague
By Dominique Falla

Requested {tagues}

1. The Orloj (or Astronomical Clock): {Kim Evans} East St. Kilda, AUS
2. One of my "Freedom of Expression" Prague posters: {Jenna Read} Gold Coast. AUS
3. A Fountain with Turtles: {Sharon Searle} Currumbin, AUS
4. A Palace Guard: {Richard Blundell} Daisy Hill, AUS
5. Bone Bell, Sedlec Ossuary, All Saint's Chapel: {Shannon and Haylee} Reedy Creek, AUS
6. A self-poured beer from your very own tap at the Beer Factory: {Kellie Leader} Southport, AUS
7. The Národní Divadlo (or the National Theatre): {Renee Sankey} Gold Coast, AUS
8. The John Lennon Wall: {Nathan Murray} Shailer Park, AUS
9. An animal...dog, cat, bird...humans excluded: {David Lydiard} Tugun, AUS
10. A person playing chess with the tag "czech mate": {Mariko Walton} Los Angeles, USA
11. A prostitute in Wenceslas Square: {Wayne Shelley} Gold Coast, AUS
12. One of the toys in the Toy Museum. Perhaps the beautiful China Doll Bust or the Deep Sea Divers: {Franca Barnabas} Melbourne, AUS
13. A Hassidic Jew worshipping at the Klaus Synagogue: {Vince McKillop} Mount Tambourine, AUS
14. A walkie talkie in the hand of a radio amateur outside the National Society for Ham Radio: {Tony Falla} Castlemaine, AUS
15. The most uninspired, bored dude being dragged around the Museum of Czech Cubism. Bonus points if he doesn't notice: {Michael Quinn} Eagleby, AUS
16. The coolest, or most impressive street stickers/sprays/stencil art you can find: {Miles Rumsey} Falmouth, UK
17. A Horse Drawn Carriage: {Richard Neville} Ormeau, AUS
18. A modern artpiece at the corner of Havirska and Na Prikope: {Martijn Savenije} Amsterdam, NL
19. A train at a station platform with the station's name included: {Michelle Robie} Castlemaine, AUS
20. The front door of the Baroque Riding School, Prague Castle: {Sally Wilde} Brisbane, AUS
21. The AC Sparta Praha Stadion: {George Karakatsanis} Byron Bay, AUS
22. A local girl's ear, and or hair: {Bianca Frankie} Brisbane, AUS
23. The Alphonse Mucha Museum: {George Manicaros} Hill End, AUS
24. Salvador Dali, at the Wax Museum (or as close to him as can be gotten): {Em Davidson} Kingston, Ont. CAN
25. Jan Hus Monument: {Albert Pak} Chicago IL, USA
26. Franz Kafka's house on Golden Lane: {Heather Faulkner} Brisbane, AUS
27. A National Treasure inside Karlstejn Castle: {Cynthia Houtzager} Southport, AUS
28. Statue of the Holy Infant Jesus, in the Church of Our Lady Victorious: {Penny Eldridge} Nerang, AUS
29. Tague a Tag: {Matt Hearne} Wongawallan, AUS
30. An OUTSTANDING door. Either beautiful or crappy: {Anke Moller} Oxenford, AUS
31. The hairiest fattest guy you can find scratching his arse: {Sharee Vitale} Tallai, AUS
32. A tree branch at the Old Jewish Cemetery: {Amy Lehr Miller} Dallastown, PA. USA
33. Anything on the third level of the Karlovy Lazne Dance Club (it has FIVE levels of nightclubbing!!): {Katie Hilton} Miami, AUS
34. A real olde Gypsy woman: {Carlina Merritt} Pimpama, AUS
35. Golden dog on the Charles Bridge: {Aleksandra Petrova} Riga, Latvia
36. The horse statue in front of the National Museum: {Andy Wang} Taipei
37. A bottle of Becherovka 38% alcohol...favourite drink of Czech people: {Mathew Griffin} Boston, MA. USA
38. A toilet seat: {Jay Woods} Burleigh Heads, AUS
39. The Nationale-Nederlanden (dancing building): {Momoko Cunneen} Tokyo, JAP
40. A chastity belt from the Museum of Torture Instruments: {Jenn Molloy} Dublin IRE
41. Any mineral found within the Magic Garnet Museum: {Justin Spicer} Seattle, WA. USA
42. An old Czech man's big toe: {Marie-Therese Bjornerud} Melbourne, AUS
43. A Gourmet Cupcake! With the Tag... "Ready for Czeching by Katelyn, the Cupcake Connoisseur": {Katelyn Hankinson} Springwood, AUS
44. Storm Type Foundry. Or some evidence of it's existence: {Denica Layton} Gold Coast, AUS
45. Someone hassling you to attend a classical music ensemble performance in the Prague Castle area. Bonus points if they're dressed in period clothing: {Scott Esdaile} Brisbane, AUS
46. Anything captivating inside or outside the historic Czech Museum Of Music building, but the closer to the piano Mozart played while visiting Prague, the better: {Erin Dyrud} Missoula, Montana, USA
47. Someone sitting alone at the Cafe Imperial. I want a photo of them including the mosaic ceiling: {Angela Nagel} Research, AUS
48. A shot of REAL absinthe... which you will then drink: {Katie Garvan} Gold Coast, AUS
49. The most BRILLIANT/BEAUTIFUL/INSPIRING book on typography that you can find: {Ashleigh Brennan} Gold Coast, AUS
50. A green glass perfume bottle from an antique market: {Kate Russell} East St. Kilda, AUS

{Tague} photostream

    Pixels are my life. Finally used those plastic things you bought me @ash_brennanPostcard #1. The turtle fountain.We "heart" numbers if you can't read it, you may be colourblind.Great logo #bluesfest
  • michelle robie: Thanks Dom, have worked my way down reading. Fab mx [...]
  • moonsail: Thanks for all your great feedback and encouragement guys. The book is coming really soon. Should be [...]
  • Alan Harrison: Hi Dominique, Wow, what a cool idea this was! As you might remember, I've been taking groups ar [...]
  • Penny: Very impressive Dominique! What a great idea. thank you for my baby Jesus statue, he's beautiful. it [...]
  • shan: loved the tague, awesome [...]

What is a Tag?

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